How does culture affect bulimia?

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The authors suggest that bulimia nervosa may be so influenced by culture because binge eating is reliant upon an individual having access to enough available food to have a binge episode. Relatedly, purging seems to predominately occur in cultures where thinness is highly valued (Keel & Klump, 2003).

How does culture affect anorexia nervosa?

Individuals diagnosed with anorexia nervosa in eastern countries, such as China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and India do not present with fat-phobic ideas about their body, whereas this is generally seen as a traditional anorexia nervosa symptom in western cultures such as in the United States.

How are anorexia and bulimia alike and different?

Anorexia and bulimia are both eating disorders that disrupt a person’s diet and body image. Anorexia typically involves restricting food intake while bulimia involves eating large amounts of food during binges and compensating with behaviors like vomiting to reduce weight gain.

Does the prevalence of bulimia vary across cultures?

Prevalence rates for bulimia nervosa ranged from 0% to 2.1% in males and from 0.3% to 7.3% in female subjects in Western countries. Prevalence rates in non-Western countries for bulimia nervosa ranged from 0.46% to 3.2% in female subjects.

What does culture have to do with eating disorders?

Eating disorders occur most often in industrialized cultures where there is an emphasis on thinness, especially if thinness is linked to success. Magazines, television, and other media have created an unrealistic image of the perfect, successful person.

Is bulimia a culture-bound syndrome?

Bulimia Nervosa is a similar culture-bound syndrome to Anorexia Nervosa in which purging is the method of losing weight. Many times people who have these eating disorders though do not have one strict eating disorder.

Do social and cultural factors cause eating disorders?

Socio-cultural factors are one of the important variables involved in development of anorexia nervosa. The prevalence of the illness has shown a definite increase in last few decades.

What are the five culture bound syndromes?

culture-bound syndrome Culture-bound syndromes include, among others, amok, amurakh, bangungut, hsieh-ping, imu, jumping Frenchmen of Maine syndrome, koro, latah, mal de pelea, myriachit, piblokto, susto, voodoo death, and windigo psychosis.

What are sociocultural factors?

Socio-cultural factors include consumers’ lifestyles, buying habits, education, religion, beliefs, values, demographics, social classes, sexuality and attitudes. These factors determine the suitability of an organisation’s products and services for its customers’ needs.

What differences exist between bulimics and anorexics quizlet?

Anorexics have distorted body image, bulimics have accurate body image; anorexics significantly below normal weight, bulimic’s weight is average or above-average. Eating disorder characterized by an inability to maintain normal weight, an intense fear of gaining weight, and distorted body perception.

Which of the following is a similarity between anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa?

Similarities Between Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa Behaviors. A preoccupation with weight and body image are found in both anorexia and bulimia eating disorders. Adolescents with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa may have an extreme fear of gaining weight and a wildly inaccurate perception of self.

Can someone have both anorexia and bulimia?

Research has shown that about one-third of those with anorexia cross over to bulimia and 14 percent of those with bulimia cross over to anorexia (Eddy, Dorer, Franko, et al., 2008).

What culture has the highest rate of eating disorders?

It is fair to say that the increasing rate of eating disorders, Japan has the highest rate of prevalence, followed by Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea. Then following are the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, China, and Vietnam [7].

Which race is most likely to have an eating disorder?

Some studies have found that White adults have a higher lifelong prevalence for eating disorders including anorexia nervosa (Udo & Grilo, 2018), bulimia nervosa (Striegel-Moore, Dohm, Kraemer, Taylor, Daniels, Crawford, & Schreiber 2003), and binge eating disorder (Udo & Grilo, 2018) compared to other ethnic groups.

What demographic is most affected in anorexia nervosa?

The diagnosis of anorexia nervosa has become more common over the past 20 years. Approximately 90 percent are women between 12 and 25 years of age. Initially found mostly in upper- and middle-class families, anorexia nervosa is now known to affect both sexes and span all ages, socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups.

Which characteristic is present in both anorexia and bulimia?

Both anorexia nervosa and bulimia are characterized by an overvalued drive for thinness and a disturbance in eating behavior.

What is diet culture?

Diet culture is the pervasive belief that appearance and body shape are more important than physical, psychological, and general well-being. It’s the idea that controlling your body, particularly your diet—by limiting what and how much you eat—is normal.

What personality characteristics seem to be associated with anorexia and bulimia?

Personality traits such as neuroticism (emotional stability), obsessiveness, and perfectionism play a large role in facilitating some eating disorders, particularly anorexia and bulimia. Research suggests that these traits are at least partially driven by genetics.

Is anorexia a culture bound disorder?

Anorexia nervosa is presently considered a Western culture-bound syndrome. A cultural focus on dieting and ideals of thinness for women are assumed to be implicated in the disorder.

What is a cultural bound syndrome?

Abstract. Culture-bound syndrome is a broad rubric that encompasses certain behavioral, affective and cognitive manifestations seen in specific cultures. These manifestations are deviant from the usual behavior of the individuals of that culture and are a reason for distress/discomfort.

Is obesity a culture-bound syndrome?

One can in fact retain use of the biological data while analyzing biomedicine, which is understood to include cultural components. Mild-to-moderate obesity in the U.S. today fits the proposed definition of a culture-bound syndrome.

What are the social factors of anorexia?

Peer pressure, preoccupation with slenderness and beauty, gaining autonomy, identity conflicts, and the slippery slope of weight loss are plausible social factors many experts believe contribute to anorexia nervosa.

What factors can contribute to anorexia?

  • Genetics. Changes in specific genes may put certain people at higher risk of anorexia.
  • Dieting and starvation. Dieting is a risk factor for developing an eating disorder.
  • Transitions.

What contributes to bulimia?

The exact cause of bulimia is unknown. Many factors could play a role in the development of eating disorders, including genetics, biology, emotional health, societal expectations and other issues.

What is an example of a culture-bound illness?

Another example of a culture-bound syndrome is hwa-byung in Korean women. In this syndrome, depression or suppressed anger may lead to complaints of an uncomfortable, yet nonpalpable, abdominal mass.

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