What is culture-bound syndrome?

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Culture-bound syndrome is a broad rubric that encompasses certain behavioral, affective and cognitive manifestations seen in specific cultures. These manifestations are deviant from the usual behavior of the individuals of that culture and are a reason for distress/discomfort.

Is anorexia nervosa a culture-bound syndrome?

Anorexia nervosa is presently considered a Western culture-bound syndrome. A cultural focus on dieting and ideals of thinness for women are assumed to be implicated in the disorder.

How does culture affect anorexia nervosa?

Individuals diagnosed with anorexia nervosa in eastern countries, such as China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, and India do not present with fat-phobic ideas about their body, whereas this is generally seen as a traditional anorexia nervosa symptom in western cultures such as in the United States.

What is an example of culture-bound syndrome?

Another example of a culture-bound syndrome is hwa-byung in Korean women. In this syndrome, depression or suppressed anger may lead to complaints of an uncomfortable, yet nonpalpable, abdominal mass.

What are the five culture-bound syndromes?

Culture-bound syndromes include, among others, amok, amurakh, bangungut, hsieh-ping, imu, jumping Frenchmen of Maine syndrome, koro, latah, mal de pelea, myriachit, piblokto, susto, voodoo death, and windigo psychosis. Also called culture-specific syndrome.

Is bulimia nervosa a culture-bound syndrome?

Some researchers have argued that eating disorder diagnoses such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are culture-bound syndromes motivated by Western ideals of thinness, while others have emphasized the substantial biological and genetic components to eating disorders.

What does culture have to do with eating disorders?

Culture has been identified as one of the etiological factors leading to the development of eating disorders. Rates of these disorders appear to vary among different cultures and to change across time as cultures evolve.

What role can cultural conditioning have in the development of eating disorders?

Historical and cross-cultural experiences suggest that cultural change itself may be associated with increased vulnerability to eating disorders, especially when values about physical aesthetics are involved.

Which cultural factor may influence the development of eating disorders?

Eating disorders occur most often in industrialized cultures where there is an emphasis on thinness, especially if thinness is linked to success. Magazines, television, and other media have created an unrealistic image of the perfect, successful person.

What are the symptoms of culture-bound syndrome?

Ataque de nervios, seen in Latin American and Latin Mediterranean cultures, is associated with a sense of being out of control, uncontrollable shouting, trembling, crying, heat in the chest rising to the head, and fainting or seizure-like episodes, and somewhat resembles panic disorder.

What are some of the physical symptoms associated with the culture-bound syndrome?

Symptoms include attacks of crying, trembling, uncon- trollable shouting, physical or verbal aggression, and intense heat in the chest moving to the head. These ataques are often associated with stressful events (e.g., death of a loved one, divorce or separation, or witnessing an accident including a family member).

What are culture-bound syndromes and provide at least one example?

Culture-bound disorders may involve somatic expressions (e.g., temporary loss of consciousness or involuntarily clenched teeth), cognitions (e.g., a belief that one’s genitals are retracting into the body or a conviction that one has been abducted by extraterrestrial beings), or behaviors (e.g., extreme startle …

How is culture-bound syndrome treated?

Suggested approaches, include psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral interventions, relaxation techniques, and social skills development (Min, 2004). A community-based, culturally tailored nursing intervention is particularly effective in treating Hwa-Byung.

Who might experience culture-bound syndrome?

The condition, known in Swedish as uppgivenhetssyndrom, or resignation syndrome, is believed to only exist among the refugee population in Sweden, where it has been prevalent since the early part of the 21st century.

Are culture-bound syndromes in DSM 5?

The DSM-51 discarded the concept of culture-bound syndromes with a preference for the term ‘cultural concepts of distress. ‘ This has been defined as ‘ways cultural groups experience, understand, and communicate suffering, behavioral problems, or troubling thoughts and emotions.

Is depression a culture-bound syndrome?

Psychiatry must recognize the cultural causes of depression and make cultural expertise an essential element of its therapeutic arsenal. Depression is a culture-bound syndrome. It is also a terrible real disease.

Is PTSD a culture-bound syndrome?

When put into context PTSD becomes a culture and history bound syndrome. It emerges in a war weary Europe dealing with the horrors of mechanised warfare a century ago. While European nations had waged war in the past, this four year long conflict was more brutal than ever seen before.

Is hikikomori a culture-bound syndrome?

Cases of hikikomori are often, but not always, classifiable as a variety of existing DSM-IV-TR (or ICD-10) psychiatric disorders. Hikikomori may be considered a culture-bound syndrome.

Is obesity a culture bound syndrome?

One can in fact retain use of the biological data while analyzing biomedicine, which is understood to include cultural components. Mild-to-moderate obesity in the U.S. today fits the proposed definition of a culture-bound syndrome.

Is anorexia a modern phenomenon?

”Most people think it is a strictly modern disease, but it was named and identified in the 1870’s,” said Joan Jacobs Brumberg, an assistant professor of history at Cornell University who is writing a book on the social and cultural history of the disorder. Dr.

What is orthorexia?

Orthorexia is an unhealthy focus on eating in a healthy way. Eating nutritious food is good, but if you have orthorexia, you obsess about it to a degree that can damage your overall well-being.

Do social and cultural factors cause eating disorders?

Socio-cultural factors are one of the important variables involved in development of anorexia nervosa. The prevalence of the illness has shown a definite increase in last few decades.

Which sociocultural factor has the greatest influence on the prevalence of eating disorders?

Sociocultural causes of eating disorders include the idealization of thin models and actresses by the media, SES, gender, and family involvement. The personality trait of perfectionism and low self-esteem are contributing factors to disorders related to eating, weight, and body shape.

What personality characteristics seem to be associated with anorexia and bulimia?

Personality traits such as neuroticism (emotional stability), obsessiveness, and perfectionism play a large role in facilitating some eating disorders, particularly anorexia and bulimia. Research suggests that these traits are at least partially driven by genetics.

What are some psychosocial factors that contribute to eating behaviors?

  • Low self-esteem.
  • Feelings of inadequacy or lack of control in life.
  • Depression, anxiety, anger or loneliness.
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